AET Alumni Profile: Logan Farrell

Logan Farrell has always been interested in fixing machinery on his family’s farm near Davidson, Saskatchewan. "It's about keeping farmers and their equipment safe and rolling..."

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Logan Farrell – AET Alumni Profile
Logan Farrell has always been interested in fixing machinery on his family’s farm near Davidson, Saskatchewan. So, when he had the chance to learn more about the trade in high school—and earn course credits at the same time—he jumped on it. Logan enrolled in Sun West Distance Learning Centre (DLC)’s Agricultural Equipment Technician (AET) courses in his Grade 11 and 12 years. Both courses consist of 50 hours of online theory as well as a work placement at a local ag equipment dealership.

“When I started the course, I didn’t really know what I wanted to do when I was older,” Logan admits. “But the first time I did the work experience at Young’s Equipment—that’s when I knew exactly what I wanted to do,” Logan remembers. “In AET20, I worked on oil changes on combines and maintenance jobs like greasing. Then in AET30, I moved on to replacing parts and even a bit of diagnosing electrical issues on sprayers. It was a really good experience and I learned a lot.”

In addition to his AET work placements, Logan was able to work part-time for Young’s Equipment during high school. After he graduated last June, the dealership offered him a full-time position. “Logan was excelling when he was in the AET program. We saw an opportunity to build Logan into a technician and we jumped at it,” said Cory Zastrizny, service manager at Young’s Equipment.

“Logan is currently working on a hydraulic drive system and being overseen by a journeyman AET. When you can get an entry-level mechanic working on a hydraulic system—especially a hydraulic drive pump on a sprayer or combine—it shows that he’s got the interest and desire to excel.” Logan's work on electronics systems in sprayers has especially caught Zastrizny's attention: "He's really confident in electrical work and he's excelling in it. It's mind-blowing."

Zastrizny has been involved with the DLC’s AET program since it began four years ago. “I’m a firm believer in the program because it gives us the opportunity to decide whether or not we are actually seeing the interest in the students to learn the trade,” he says. “I can’t say enough about the program. The techs in the shop and the staff here in the front love working with these kids too, because they can see how much the kids are enjoying it—just having the chance to show us what they can do.”

For Logan, it’s a more than just a job: “It’s about keeping the farmers and their equipment safe and rolling in the busy times so that they can put food on the table,” he says, “It’s a great field to be working in.”